52 Ancestors Week #25 – Probate of David Roberts of Llwynysgolog, Llanfairfechan, Wales


No Story Too Small has issued a New Year’s Challenge: “Have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

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Last week I wrote of my ancestor Jane Catherine Roberts, of Llanfairfechan, Wales (http://passagetothepast.wordpress.com/2014/06/20/52-ancestors-week-24-jane-catherine-roberts-of-llanfairfechan/) and mentioned her maternal grandfather, David Roberts born in Gyffyn, Wales (“GYFFIN, a parish in the hundred of Isaf, county Carnarvon, 2 miles from Conway. The parish, which is of considerable extent, containing five townships, is situated near the river Conway”, From The National Gazetteer of Great Britain and Ireland, 1868).

Gryffn

His baptism has not been located; he married Anne Roberts on 18 April 1821 in Llanfairfechan.

e4fe80cc-5438-45e4-ae03-366620ce0c95

He died on Whitsun Monday 1834, a legal holiday in Wales (the day after Whitsunday, the Christian festival of Pentacost, the seventh Sunday after Easter, which commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon Christ’s disciples).

David was buried on 22 May 1834 at about the age of 47.

Very little is known of his life.  He was a farmer and resided in a home called Llwynysgolog, a farm of about 80 acres.  He had a will dated 22 April 1834 (about a month prior to his death) which names his four children and assigns their guardians; one being his brother, William Roberts of a home called Llwydfaen in Llanbedr.  The full document can be seen here: probate David Roberts 1835

will

death d roberts

The inventory list gives us a small glimpse of his life and an idea of what type of farm he may have run.  Value of his assets were  £386 (or about $17,765 in 2014 buying power).

A True and Perfect Inventory of the Personal Estate Viz the Goods Chattels Household Furniture be of David Roberts of Llwynysgolog in the Parish of Llanfair fechan in the County of Caernarvon Farmer lately Deceased.

Viz 6 Milk Cows    31.0.0 31.0.0
1 Bull 4.0.0
2 Oxen 3 years old at 5 a head 10.0.0
7 Runts 2 years old at 4 a head 20.0.0
5 Yearlings at 2 10 a head 12.10.0
4 Calves at 15/ ahead 3.0.0
250 Small sheep at 10/ ahead 125.0.0
2 Team Horses 13.10.0
6 Mountain Ponies 25.0.0
7 Store Pigs at 25/6 8.17.0
1 Cow and Litter 3.6.0
Old Carts, Ploughs, Harrows, Gears and all implements of Husbandry 20.5.0
Wheat in Granary and unthreshed 26.0.0
Barley in Granary and unthreshed 38.0.0
Oats in Granary 4.11.0
Winnow Machine 4.0.0
Household Furniture including his clothes 30.0.0
£386.13.0

NB This Inventory Value by David Evans Llwynysgolog [his widow’s second husband, who she married 9 May 1835] and Thomas Griffin Ty’n Llwyfan on this 11 day of June 1834

inventory

 

Definitions:
(1) Runts – small ox or cow, especially one of various Scottish Highland or Welsh breeds.
(2) Yearlings – an animal (usually a horse) that is between one and two years old.
(3) Store Pig – a small pig that has not yet been weened, to be fattened up for market.
(4) Harrow – an agricultural machine used for deeper tillage. Harrowing is often carried out on fields to follow the rough finish left by ploughing operations to break up clods (lumps of soil) and to provide a finer finish.
(5) Unthreshed – not yet threshed.
(6) Threshed – to separate the grain or seed by some mechanical means as by beating with a flail or the action of a machine.
(7) Husbandry – the care, cultivation, and breeding of crops and animals.
(8) Winnow Machine – an agricultural method developed by ancient cultures for separating grain from chaff (the dry, scaly protective casings of the seeds). It is also used to remove weevils or other pests from stored grain.

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by ethomson1@comcast.net on June 25, 2014 at 4:39 PM

    17K not bad for 1834!

    Reply

  2. […] – “Probate of David Roberts of Llwynysgolog, Llanfairfechan, Wales” on Passage to the Past’s […]

    Reply

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