My Acadian 30 – week #10, Georges LeBlanc

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In 2007, I joined Ancestry.com.  It never occurred to me that online, unsourced trees were inaccurate.  I essentially “copied” my entire Acadian family from potentially erroneous public trees and never looked back.  Although my newer entries are sourced, a visit to Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies] in 2014,  revealed a number of errors. I am determined to start from scratch, and verify that I have all available records beginning with the 30 direct ancestors, connected to my maternal grandmother. This includes her parents, grandparents, g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents.

yvonne roy

To keep the project manageable, I will write of one ancestor each week.

Prior Weeks (click on a name to read the sketch)

Generation 1

Week #1 – Yvonne Marie (Roy) Billings

Generation 2

Week #2 – Pius/Paul Dost Roy

Week #3 –  Marie Laura “Laura” Melanson

Generation 3

Week #4 –  Docité OR Dosithée Roy

Week #5 – Victoire LeBlanc

Week #6 – Magloire Melanson

Week #7 – Ausithe/Osite Dupuis

Generation 4

Week #8 – Joseph Roy/Roi (King)

Week #9 – (Judith) Angélique Belliveau

10. Georges LeBlanc, son and fourth known child of Sifroi LeBlanc and Victoire Bastarache, was baptized on 09 Feb 1844 in Bouctouche, Kent, New Brunswick, Canada.

my Georges birth

According to Stephen A. White, Georges’ full siblings included: Madeline, Jacques, Aime and Sifroi (see his handwritten notes below)

In 1861 Georges (White) LeBlanc, age 16, and mother Victoire are living in Wellington Parish with step-father Julian LeBlanc & half-siblings. Next door (or nearby) is Georges future wife Madeleine (White) LeBlanc, age 18 who resides with her parents Joseph & Marguerite and siblings Daniel and Oliver.

1861 census madeline2

As mentioned in prior posts:

– Joseph LeBlanc & Marguerite Collet had a son name Georges and a daughter named Madeleine.

– Sifroi LeBlanc & Victoire Bastarache had a son name Georges and a daughter named Madeleine.

One child from each family married the other – Georges to Madeleine and Georges to Madeleine!

Sifroi

Georges married Madeleine of Joseph LeBlanc & Marguerite Collet in Bouctouche on 2 May 1864. They were both about 20 years of age.

george and marie bouctouche

You are noticing that the marriage record from the Drouin indexes does not specifically name Georges and Madeleine’s parents.  Stephen White has been working these families for decades!  He has been able to determine the likelihood of who was married to whom and born to whom because he has studied the entire population.  There are likely additional analyses and records to which I do not have access or that I have not reviewed (like all of the birth/marriage/death records of each of their children).

According to Stephan A. White, the couple had eleven known children (I did not spend much time gathering records for them as this is a project for my “to do” list when I next visit Moncton, but I welcome additional information from cousins!):

  • Victoire (my direct ancestor, see week #5 sketch)
  • Henriette – She married Vital Roy 22 April 1887 at Ste Marie, son of Joseph Roy/Roi (King) and (Judith) Angélique Beliveau.  He was a brother to Victorie’s husband. She died, age 23 on 20 Oct 1890 of consumption, and was buried at Mont-Carmel (record here and here).

              They had one known child:

(a) Georges, b. 13 Mar 1889, St. Mary’s (PANB birth); d. 1892, age 3, buried 6 June in Ste Marie de Mont-                 Carmel (Drouin Collection death)

  • Matilde – She died in 1890, cause unknown, age 21, no known children (record here).
  • Vitaline – She died in 1871, as an infant (record here).
  • Eugenie – She married Richard LeBlanc, 7 Sept 1891, in Sainte-Marie-de-Kent (record here).  She died in Ste-Marie-de-Kent, age 61, on 30 Oct 1933 (record here)
  • Zelia – She married David Caissie 18 Nov 1895 and died 7 Feb 1944. Thanks to a Facebook friend for providing details!

Zelica marriage Zelica death

  • Nerie – He married Marguerite LeBlanc, daughter of  ___zade and Genevieve LeBlanc, on 03 Feb 1902, at St Mary’s (record here).  He married second Alice Cormier, daughter of Josue (?) Cormier and Marie Melançon, on 15 Feb 1912 at St Mary’s (record here).
  • Marguerite
  •  Adelard – He married Emma Gaudet, daughter of John Gaudet and Veronique Maillet, on 26 Nov 1906, at St Mary’s (record here). He died 9 June 1912 (record here).
  •  Sara – may have died 10 Dec 1905 in Ste-Marie, age 21, of consumption, no parents named on the death entry (record here).
  • Annie – Married Sylvain Gaudet, son of Laurant and Genevieve LeBlanc, Mar 1905, at St Mary’s (record here), she was the last to die. Thanks to a Facebook friend for locating her obituary in Evangeline Newspaper dated 9 Jan 1970.

annie death

In 1871, the family was enumerated in Wellington Parish (possibly in or near Ste Marie; Wellington was established in 1814 and included Saint Mary Parish until 1867) .

  • George, 27 (unable to read or write);
  • Madeleine, 27 (unable to write);
  • Victoire, 6;
  • Henriette, 4;
  • Matilde, 2;
  • Vitaline, 2 months

1871 leblanc

Georges owned 50 acres of land, 25 of which was improved and included one dwelling house and one barn/stable.  They had two carriages/sleighs; four cars/wagons or sleds; two plows or cultivators.  The family had one horse over three years old, five sheep and four swine/pigs.  Two swine had been killed or sold for slaughter or export. They produced nice pounds of wool; thirty-three yards of homemade cloth/flannel and three yards of homemade linen.

They dedicated one acre to producing five bushels of spring wheat, one bushel of barley, 300 bushels of oats, 15 bushels of rye and 35 bushels of buckwheat.  Two acres produced 160 bushels of potatoes and two bushels of turnips.  One and half acres were dedicated to producing the hay crop (one ton of 2,000 pound bundles of 16 pounds of hay), one and a half bushels flax-seed and five pounds of flax or hemp. He also produced 100 pounds of maple syrup. The land produced sixteen cords of firewood.

Georges was a fisherman. He did not own any type of water vessel but reported  23 fathoms of nets and seizes of all sorts (a fathom is about six feet) . He caught 1/3 barrel gaspareaux (name of a common salt-water fish of Acadia, also called alewife), ten barrels of oysters and 10 barrels of other fishes (not defined – see list of fishes that were categorized in image below).

1871 leblanc

In 1881, the family was enumerated in Ste Marie, St Mary’s Parish.

  • George, 38;
  • Madeleine, 38;
  • Victoire, 15;
  • Henriette, 13 (attending school);
  • Matilde, 11  (attending school);
  • Eugenie, 8;
  • Milie Zeliah (Zelie), 6,
  • Nerie, 1;
  • Marguerite, 1 month

1881 census george

Georges died on 14 Feb 1891 in Sainte-Marie-de-Kent, New Brunswick, of consumption, he was 47 and had been sick for a year. I did not locate his grave during my 2015 visit or at http://www.acadian-cemeteries.acadian-home.org/frames.html

Georges death

758e5902-93c5-4d63-90c1-7acab1d7c3cc

The City of Bangor vs. Asa P. Lansil – 1863

 

asa paine

 

My 3rd g-grandfather, Asa Paine Lansil, the fifth known child of Charles V. Lansil (Lancel/Lanselle) and Ruth Paine, was born 17 Oct 1812 in Bucksport, Hancock, Maine.   He married Betsey Turner Grout, daughter of Amos Grout and Rachael Couillard, 2 November 1834, in Bucksport.  Asa, a Cooper, settled in Bangor, Maine, with his wife and six (or perhaps seven) children, where they remained until about 1871, at which time the family relocated to Boston Massachusetts. 

I have written of Asa in the past but not of his noteworthy case as a defendant at the Supreme Judicial Court of Maine against the City of Bangor (the plantiff) in 1863.

Asa, purchased land on the corner of Maine and Lincoln Streets in Bangor for $500 from Wiggins Hill, a merchant, on 15 Dec 1848 (book 192, page 375).  The land is described as:

Beginning at the corner of Maine and Lincoln Street, hence running Westerly on the line of Lincoln Street 100 feet thence at right angles with Lincoln Street Northerly about 70 feet to the dividing lines between said lot and land owned by Thomas Curtis and others as divided by George W Pickering and others, hence Easterly on said line to Maine Street hence Southerly on Maine Street to the point began at more or less.

Lincoln Street Purchase

On 28 Jan 1851 Asa bought land (book 212/page 140) on Buck Street for $500 from his brother James (formerly known as Lincoln Street, lot #8) which Martha Lansil (his brother’s wife) had previously purchased of Wiggins Hill (book 150/page 554). It measured 70 feet on Buck Street and 107 feet deep, per an 1844 survey by Gilman.   Asa later sold this parcel to Joshua Miller on 2 Feb 1853 (book 231/ page 341).

On 1 May 1852, Asa purchased land adjoining to that purchased in 1848 (known as lot #2) on Lincoln Street from Wiggins Hill (book 248/page 470) for $150.  It was an additional 69 1/2 feet by 500 feet.

Lansil land

On this land there was a swale (a low tract of land, that is moist or marshy).  When Lincoln Street was constructed in 1834, the water flowed in gutters down the street until it got to Asa’s lot where it flowed over his property in larger amounts than it had previously.  Asa add fill to the lot, in 1852, to stop the water.  The Bangor Street Commissioner, without town approval began to dig a drain; Asa finished it himself. Later, the drain fell into disrepair.  Asa choose not to repair it, the City of Bangor (after giving Asa notice), repaired and enlarged the drain, then took Asa to court to recover $43 in expenses.

The appeal went to the Supreme Court.

The Supreme Court’s role is to decide on questions of law that arise when a case is appealed from a trial court. Opinions are published and become binding on all the (Maine) courts when they adjudicate similar disputes. The Lansil decision is still cited in cases today.

In the Lansil case, the Court issued the following opinion:

“The owner of land has a legal right to fill it up so as to interrupt the flow of surface water over it, whether flowing from a highway, or any adjoining land. Nor does the fact, that the land filled up was a swale (a low tract of land, especially one that is moist or marshy), make any difference in the owner’s rights, provided no natural watercourse is obstructed. If, in filling up his lot, the owner construct a drain for the flow of surface water from the highway, which had been accustomed to flow across his lot, and afterwards allow the drain to become obstructed, and it is repaired by the town, the latter can maintain no action to recover the expense of such repairs. Such a drain is not a “private drain,” within the meaning of § 12 of c. 16 of the Revised Statutes”.

Case, under § 12, c. 16, of E. S., to recover the amount expended by the plaintiffs in the repair of a drain.

The evidence, affecting the questions of law raised, tended to show that the drain in question was from Lincoln street, through the defendant’s lot, and another lot, to a drain made by the city; that the defendant’s lot was formerly a swale, and the surface water flowed across it, but there was no natural watercourse on it; that Lincoln street was constructed in 1834, and, after that, the surface water flowed in gutters down the street, till it came to the defendant’s lot, and then passed off across his lot, in greater quantities than before the construction of the street; that, in 1852, the defendant filled up his lot so as to prevent the water from flowing from the street over it; and, thereupon, the street commissioner, without authority from the city, dug the drain and the defendant finished it, and the water from the street had passed off through it, until recently; that, the defendant failing to repair the drain after proper notice, the plaintiffs had repaired and enlarged it; and this action was brought to recover $43, the expenses incurred.

The presiding Judge instructed the jury, that it appeared by the testimony that there was a low swale on the lot of defendant, over which the water from the land in the vicinity naturally flowed; that, if defendant bought the lot under these circumstances, he had no legal right to fill up the lot and obstruct the natural flow of the water, and thus cause it to flow back into the street, and upon adjoining owners; that, if defendant filled up his lot, he was bound to make a suitable drain to carry away the water, so as, not to injure the highway and adjoining proprietors; that, if defendant made the drain under these circumstances, it was a private drain, which he was bound to keep in repair, and, if he neglected to do so, and in consequence of such neglect, the highway was injured, the plaintiffs, after due notice, could themselves repair such drain and recover the expense of the defendant in this action.

The defendant (inter alia) requested the presiding Judge to instruct the jury, that, if the plaintiffs duly laid out and constructed Lincoln street, and the water flowed down the drains of such street to the defendant’s lot which abutted upon said street, and a drain across the defendant’s lot was needed to drain the water from the street, the defendant was under no legal obligation to construct such*drain, but the law provided another remedy to secure the construction of the drain, and, if defendant, without permit from the proper authorities, and through a misapprehension of his legal rights and obligations, constructed such drain, such construction would not of itself constitute it a private drain.

The presiding Judge refused to give the requested instructions, but did instruct the jury that, if more water was brought by the drains on Lincoln street down to the defendant’s lot than naturally flowed there, the jury would deduct from the expenses of repair in like proportion.

The jury returned a verdict for plaintiffs of twenty-seven dollars, and stated, in answer to an inquiry from the Court, that they reduced the damages, because more water was brought to the defendant’s lot by the construction of the street than formerly flowed there. The defendant excepted [objected].

W. H. McCrillis, for defendant.

A. Q. Wakefield, for plaintiffs.

The opinion of a majority of the Court was drawn up by

Davis, J.—By our statute of 1821, c. 121, copied from the Massachusetts Act of 1797, a person needing a drain “for his cellar,” or for other purposes, could construct it, upon his own premises, to the street; and then, “by the consent and under the direction of the selectmen,” he, either alone, or with others, might extend it across or along the street, to some suitable place of discharge. If there were several owners, it was a “common sewer.” But, whether owned by one or more, it was a private drain.

Such drains were entirely different and distinct from gutters, made as part of streets, to drain off the surface water. Such gutters had always been made, under the general power and duty to open the streets and keep them in repair.

Unless by some city charters or by-laws, no public sewers, for the accommodation of the inhabitants, were authorized by law, until 1844. All such sewers, though constructed under and along the streets, were private property. And no change has ever been made in the law, making such drains other than private property. Many such may be found in all our cities and large towns.

By c. 94 of the laws of 1844, the municipal authorities were, for the first time, empowered to locate and construct public drains, for the common use of such adjacent proprietors as, for a stipulated price, desired to connect private drains therewith. These public sewers were to be located, either under the streets, or, if necessary, through the lands of any person, who was to be compensated therefor. The proceedings of the location are, in many respects, like the proceedings in locating streets.

As cities and towns were only authorized, and not required, to construct public drains, the sewerage of our cities has been, and still is, to a large extent, by private drains. These have, many of them, been made across or along the streets. As they were liable to get out of repair, there had always been a provision by which any owner could repair a “common” sewer, at the expense of all.

But it was found that, in some cases, none of the owners would repair such drains; and that, by their want of repair, the streets across or along which they were constructed, were thereby made unsafe for the public travel. And therefore, by c. 77, § 9, of the laws of 1854, the street commissioner of the city of Portland was authorized, in any such case, to repair the defective “private drain ;” and the owners were made liable to the city for the expense of such repairs. This special statute was made general, by R. S., c. 16, § 12.

The action before us was brought under this provision of the statute.

Was the drain repaired by the city in this case such a drain as is contemplated by the statute?

It is quite obvious that it was not a public drain, or sewer, within the meaning of the statute. It was neither located, nor constructed, as such. None of the provisions relating to sewerage by public drains, to be made and owned by the city, for the use of the abutters on the streets, are applicable to it.

In discussing the question whether it was a “private drain,” it is contended, in behalf of the city, that the defendant, in 1852, had no right to fill up his house lot, which was at the lowest point of a swale crossed by Lincoln street, so as to prevent the water flowing down the gutters either way, during a storm, from passing off over his lot, as before it was filled up.

His right to fill up his lot, depended on the question whether there had been a natural watercourse across the lot before Lincoln street was made. That street was made in 1834. No right to flow water across it had therefore been acquired, by prescription or otherwise, in 1852, unless there had been a watercourse there before 1834. If there had not been a watercourse there, though it was low, swampy land, and, with the adjacent lots, had been overflowed at certain seasons of the year, he had the right to fill it up.

A natural watercourse “consists of bed, banks, and water; yet the water need not flow continuously; and there are many watercourses that are sometimes dry. There is, however, a distinction to be taken in law, between a regular flowing stream of water, which at certain seasons is dried up, and those occasional bursts of water, which in times of freshet, or melting of ice and snow, descend from the hills, and inundate the country.” Angell on Watercourses, 5th ed., § 1. *

In accordance with this definition, it has been held, that, “when there is no watercourse, or stream of water, one cannot claim a right of drainage, or flow of water, from off his land, upon and through the land of another, merely because his land is higher than that of the other, and slopes towards it, so that the water which falls in rain upon it would naturally run over the surface in that direction.” Luther v. Winnissimet Co., 9 Cush., 171.

Whether there had been a watercourse was a question for the jury. If there had not been, then the defendant had the right to fill up his lot; and he was under no obligation to make any drain, or permit the city to make one.

But, if there had been a watercourse, though the defendant had no right to fill it up, still this action could not be maintained. The statute applies only to a “private drain,” made strictly for private use, which the owners may keep open, or fill up, at their option, leaving the street in good repair. But a watercourse is private property only in a restricted sense. The owner of the land through which it flows has no right to fill it up, to divert the water from the land below, nor to turn it back upon the land above. For so doing, he is liable to indictment, or to an action on the case at commonlaw, for the damage caused by the detention or flowage of the water. Calais v. Dyer, 7 Maine, 155.

But the action given by the statute, for the expense of repairing, cannot be applied to a watercourse, even if it is used for a drain. The language is clearly applicable only to drains and sewers which are strictly private property. The city can have no right to use such drains. The owners cannot be under obligation to keep such drains open for the benefit of the city. If the street gutters were opened into them, they would no longer be private, but public.

It is clear that the drain in this case is not such as the statute refers to, as a “private drain.” If it was a watercourse, and the defendant was bound to keep it open, the remedy must be sought in a different action, not for the expense of repairing, but for the damage caused by obstructing it. The verdict must be set aside, and a new trial granted.

Appleton, C. J., Kent, Walton and Barrows, JJ., concurred.

Cutting, Dickerson and Danforth, JJ., disseuted.

Cutting, J. — There are only two kinds of drains known to the law—one a public and the other a private drain. Public drains arc those constructed by the municipal officers of a town under R. S., c. 16, § 2. All other drains are private drains, and embrace two classes. The first such as connect with a public drain by permission of the municipal officers, and the second without such connection; of which latter class the defendant’s drain was one.

It appears that Lincoln street was established and built in 1834, running through a low swale, extending from above and below the sides of the road down and across the lot subsequently purchased and filled up by the defendant; that a culvert was built across the street above the lot, bellow which culvert a drain extended down and through the defendant’s lot to a public drain below. As to the construction of this drain, thus passing through the defendant’s land, by whom and for what purposes built, there was controversy, but none whatever as to its actual existence. It was not a public drain, for it was not constructed by the municipal officers, and, if the street commissioner assisted in its construction, it was without authority and consequently a gratuitous act. It is true the defendant swears “that it is not a private drain nor any use to his lot, nor of any private advantage to him.” The existence of the drain being admitted, it became a question of law as to its character. He may perhaps, now, in a certain sense truly say, after having filled up his lot, dammed up the road, and caused an overflow of water, that the drain is of no use to him so long as he is high and dry, and suffered so to remain in consequence of this drain. But the more important question now is, whether that drain is of any use to the public. When a road is legally laid out, and constructed, no owner of adjoining lands has lawful right by embankments to create an overflow of water; otherwise highways instead of being a public benefit would be a public nuisance, and such would be the situation of Lincoln street, if the defendant should prevail in this suit. Against such an, act even the common law would afford a remedy, which is also found in § 12 of the Act before cited.

The instructions were in harmony with this construction of the law, except they were too favorable for the defendant, by which the damages were reduced as found by the jury.

Dickerson and Danporth, JJ., concurred.

My Acadian 30 – week #9, (Judith) Angélique Beliveau

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In 2007, I joined Ancestry.com.  It never occurred to me that online, unsourced trees were inaccurate.  I essentially “copied” my entire Acadian family from potentially erroneous public trees and never looked back.  Although my newer entries are sourced, a visit to Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies] in 2014,  revealed a number of errors. I am determined to start from scratch, and verify that I have all available records beginning with the 30 direct ancestors, connected to my maternal grandmother. This includes her parents, grandparents, g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents.

yvonne roy

To keep the project manageable, I will write of one ancestor each week.

Prior Weeks (click on a name to read the sketch)

Generation 1

Week #1 – Yvonne Marie (Roy) Billings

Generation 2

Week #2 – Pius/Paul Dost Roy

Week #3 –  Marie Laura “Laura” Melanson

Generation 3

Week #4 –  Docité OR Dosithée Roy

Week #5 – Victoire LeBlanc

Week #6 – Magloire Melanson

Week #7 – Ausithe/Osite Dupuis

Generation 4

Week #8 – Joseph Roy/Roi (King)

9. (Judith) Angélique Belliveau, the second known child and daughter of Amand Belliveau and Nathalie Bourgeois, was born 08 Nov 1831 (birth date from 1901 census) and baptized the next day at St Henri Parish, Barachois [Yes, the spine reads “Bouctouche”; according to Facebook researchers and Acadian genealogist/researcher Lucie LeBlanc Consentino (website here) in digitizing the parish registers, Jean-Pierre Pepin, somehow mixed up the spine from Bouctouche to the Barachois parish registers. From what I understand, this effects Drouin records dated 1812-1838.  Ancestry.com has them indexed correctly as Barachois].

angelique baptizm

Barachois

Siblings

I am still sorting through her siblings (I am guessing Stephen A. White’s binders at the University of Moncton could add some clarity – another project for my next visit!), but they seem to include:

[note: if a census year is listed, it refers to the child residing with parents in 1851 & 1861, or mother in 1871]

Marie –  baptized 13 Oct 1828 (Memramcook book/page 6-8, record here).  No entry for a marriage or death has been found.

Calixte – baptized  7 April 1832 (Memramcook, book/page 6-90), 1851 census, 1861 census (as Charles?), 1871 census (as Clis?), married Bibiane Leblanc, daughter of Benoni and Marie Bourque, in 1864 at Cap-Pelé (record here). He was a farmer; they had at least five children: Sifroi, Honore, Donat, Obeline and Louis. He died 1875, age 43 at Scoudouc (record here).

Justine – baptized  3 Oct 1833, godparents Joseph LeBlanc and Marie Richard (Memramcook, book/page 6-108, record here), 1851 census, may have married Joseph Bourque in Scoudouc in 1854, parents are not named (record here), she is not listed with Amand/Nathalie in 1861 census (unless she was enumerate as Saley – see below)…. In the 1851 census  “she” is listed as a “he”.  Looking at the birth record, I couldn’t read fils or filles. Some family trees (unsourced) list “him” as Justin. A death entry has been found for the Justine who married Jospeph Borque (thanks to a Facebook friend!), however no parents are named:

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Denis – baptized 8 Dec 1834 at Barachois, godparents Jean Goudet and Marie LeBlanc (record here), 1851 census, on 31 Jan 1859 he may have married Marguerite D’Aigle at Bouctouche, Pacifique Belliveau was a witness, no parents named (record here).  Or he could still be with his parents in 1861 and enumerated as Dominique (see below). No death entry has been found.

Pacifique – baptized 9 Jan 1837 (Memramcook, book/page 6-192), 1851 census, 1861 census, it is possible that he married Rose LeBlanc in Memrmcook, parents are not named but the couple received a marriage dispensation for 3rd and 4th degree consanguinity, so additional research may confirm  (record here);  the Pacifique who married Rose died at St-Anselme 02 Jan 1883 (record here), he was age 45, thus the right age to be “our” Pacifique.

Euphemie – b. abt 1839, 1851 census, 1861 census, possibly married Dominic Landry in Memramcook (8-121) on 25 Nov 1856, parents are not named, but Justine Belliveau is a witness (record here). No death entry has been found.

Vital – b. abt 1840, 1851 census, 1861 census, died 1862 age 22 – record here. He was enumerated with his parents in 1861, and his parents are mentioned in his death record (not a spouse), so unless he was widowed, it seems unlikely that he married.

Sifroi – b. Aug 1841 (per 1900 census), 1851 census, possibly 1861 census (perhaps as Israel?, Amand had a brother of this name) named as “Dr. Sifroi of Boston” here.  In 1870 he is living in Boston with his wife Kate/Catherine (Bergin) and two year old daughter Nathalie, he is a clerk in Hadley Company (record here). They had a second child, Joseph, born 1871. Katherine died 28 March 1874 of Phthisis/Tuberculosis (record here). He married second Henriette Azelda Leger in Waltham, Massachusetts, 24 Nov 1874, his occupation is “trader” (record here). By 1900, they are living in Melrose, Massachusetts with their 19-year-old daughter Edna, he is a dentist, has been naturalized and claims to have entered the country in 1866 (record here). No death entry has been found.

Eustache – b. abt 1844, 1851 census, 1861 census, possibly married Francoise Richard daughter of Ambroise and Marguerite LeBlanc as listed in unsourced trees. In 1871, there is a single 22 year old man of this name residing in Dorchester (record here). No marriage or death entry has been found. 

Hyppolite – baptized  7 Feb 1845 (Memramcook, book/page 7-5, record here), 1851 census, 1861 census, 1871 census, married 23 Nov 1868, Adelaide Goguen, daughter of Magloire and Eulalie Bourque (record here). Known children include Urbain, Nathalie, Eugenie, Donat, Leonie, Melina, Marcel, Octavie and Emile.   He was widowed and married second, Marie Belliveau, daughter of Max and Justine Melanson, 14 Oct 1912 in Scoudouc (record here).  In the census years 1891, 1901, 1911 and 1921 he resided in Shediac Parish in the area of Malakoff/Dorchester Road, Scoudouc. No death entry has been found.

Dosithee – baptized 27 Aug 1846 (Memramcook, book/page 7-41, record here), 1851 census, 1861 census. No death entry has been found.

Osithe – baptized 24 July 1848, godparents were Jean Belliveau and Marie Belliveau, (Memramcook, book/page 7-61), 1851 census, 1861 census, 1871 census, married Urbain Cormier, son of Simon and Clemence Goguen 1871, Scoudouc, names her father as deceased (record here).  Children include: Antoine Joseph and possibly others.  She was not located in later censuses; no death entry has been found.

Henriette – baptized 16 Feb 1852 (Saint Jacques, Scoudouc – record here), 1851 census [? is this really her ?], 1861 census (maybe, as Jane ?), 1871 census, married Eustache Babin in 1884, Scoudouc, (record here); It says that her parents were both deceased – it also says that the couple received a marriage dispensation for 2nd degree consanguinity (de sang) and 3rd degree affinity. And there having been no other impediments , we priest undersigned received their mutual consent of marriage and have given them the nuptial blessing in the presence of Dominique Belliveau and Elizabeth, etc.. She died 23 Feb 1915 and is buried in Scoudouc (link here).

Benoni – baptized 2 Apr 1854 godparents Pacifique Belliveau and Marguerite Leger (record here), d. 1855 (record on Ancestry.com here) – both Saint Jacques, Scoudouc

Questionable:

Saley (??) b. abt 1834 – “daughter” in 1861 census but not in 1851 census?? The age is right for this to be Justine.

Dominique (??)  –  b. abt 1834 – “son” in 1861 census but not in 1851 census?? The age is right for this to be Denis.

Gertude (??) – b. abt 1835 – “son” in 1861 census – not in 1851 census??

Edouard – no baptism located and not listed with Amand in the 1851 census, but unsourced online trees list a marriage date of 21 Nov 1854 in Scoudouc to Domitille Boudreau.  The marriage record (found here) does not name parents.  The given name of the Belliveau witness can’t be read but does not appear to be a child of Amand. The entry is recorded immediately preceding Justine’s marriage. Could this be the Gertude enumerated in the 1861 census?

1851 Census

In 1851, Angélique  was residing with her family in Shediac Parish (likely in Scoudouc); her father was a farmer.

1851

1861 Census – Amand and Nathalie (record here)

1861 census Amand

Marriage and Children

Angélique married Joseph Roy/Roi (King), the fifth and youngest known child, of François Roy/Roi and Vénérande Savoie, 13 Nov 1855, in Scoudouc, Westmorland, New Brunswick.

White card

As outlined in Joseph’s sketch, known children of Joseph and Angelique included:
Docite/Dosithee, Sifroi, Henriette, Sylvain, Cécile, Vital, Olivier and Jude.

Her father Amand died between 1861 and 1871.  Her widowed mother, Nathalie who died 21 May 1878 in Scoudouc, Westmorland, New Brunswick, Canada is listed in her brother, Calixte’s, household in 1871 (record here).

Angelique is found in the 1871-1901 censuses as detailed in her husband Joseph’s sketch.

Angelique, a farmer’s wife, died on 13 March 1907 at age 77, the cause was “decline”, she had been ill “all winter”. She is likely buried in St Mary’s.

angeliques death

6e34d2ac-362d-445b-a5bd-787de11e6eeb

My Acadian 30 – week #8, Joseph Roy/Roi (King)

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO SEE A LARGER VERSION!

In 2007, I joined Ancestry.com.  It never occurred to me that online, unsourced trees were inaccurate.  I essentially “copied” my entire Acadian family from potentially erroneous public trees and never looked back.  Although my newer entries are sourced, a visit to Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies] in 2014,  revealed a number of errors. I am determined to start from scratch, and verify that I have all available records beginning with the 30 direct ancestors, connected to my maternal grandmother. This includes her parents, grandparents, g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents.

yvonne roy

To keep the project manageable, I will write of one ancestor each week.

Prior Weeks (click on a name to read the sketch)

Generation 1

Week #1 – Yvonne Marie (Roy) Billings

Generation 2

Week #2 – Pius/Paul Dost Roy

Week #3 –  Marie Laura “Laura” Melanson

Generation 3

Week #4 –  Docité OR Dosithée Roy

Week #5 – Victoire LeBlanc

Week #6 – Magloire Melanson

Week #7 – Ausithe/Osite Dupuis

Generation 4

8. Joseph Roy/Roi (King), the fifth and youngest known child, of François Roy/Roi and Vénérande Savoie, was likely born about 20 May 1829 in Wellington Parish, in the village of Bouctouche, New Brunswick (no church entry has been located; the 1901 census reports an exact birth date and his death certificate claims a Wellington parish birth.  The informant is unknown in these documents, thus the accuracy can not be predicted, however census data consistently points to a birth year of about 1829).

No document directly names Joseph’s parents; my source for this information is Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies]; he allowed me to photograph his notes (published here with his permission):

Stephen White Joseph Roy

Stephen White Joseph Roy pg2

Stephen White Joseph Roy pg3Indirect evidence corroborates:

  • The 1861 census lists our subject as Joseph “junior”, his likely father as François “junior” and likely grandfather as François “senior”.  Perhaps the enumerator meant to communicate that Joseph was the son of Francois Roy/Roi who resided next door or on the same farm.
  • Joseph’s middle name is François [as recorded at the baptism of Joseph’s son, Sylvain];
  • François and Venerande were named as godparents to Joseph’s daughter Libie;
  • François witnessed Joseph’s first marriage, and
  • their single daughter Agnes (named as godmother to Joseph’s sons Cyrille and Docite), in 1861 resided with François and then likely resided with Joseph’s eldest son Cyrille from at least 1871 until her death in 1894. Agnes’s baptism entry (below) does name François and Venerande as her parents.

agnes baptism

 

  • Joseph Jr., his wife Angelique and Francois Jr., owned land together in Wellington Parish which they jointly sold to Dominique Robicheau as recorded in deed book T, page 79 on 17 December 1869 (Venerande died prior to the transaction, in 1858).

The proximity, frequent interaction and transactions between Joseph, Francois and Venerande during their lifetime point to them being close kin.

record-image_TH-266-11808-59914-65record-image_TH-266-11808-61978-52

——————————————————————————————————————————————

Joseph’s  known siblings, whose baptism’s were recorded in Bouctouche, include: Olive, Agnes, Pierre and Marie.

Nothing is known of Joseph’s early years; he was likely an uneducated farm hand, working for his father in the small village of Bouctouche, where the population was under 500.

In the parish of St-Jean-Baptiste, Bouctouche a marriage is recorded between Joseph Roi and Henriette Legere in 1847:

Le 2 fevrier 1847 apres après la publication ordinince des bans de mariage faite a nos  messes paroissiales entre Joseph Roi et Henriette Legere apres avoir accorde dispense du 3 au 3 et du 4 au 4me degre de consanguinite en vertue des facultes accordees a monseigneur William Dallard par un indulte du sd Octobre 1842 par le St. Siege Ad decennium ces dites facultes nous ayant ete accordies nous avons reçu leur  consentement mutual de mariage et leur avons donne la benediction nuptiale en presence de Francois Roi, Isaac LeBlanc

Which translates to something like:

On February 2, 1847 after the publication of banns ordinance made ​​to our parish masses between Joseph Roi and Henrietta Legere after having granted dispensation from 3 to 3 and 4 to the 4th degree of consanguinity in virtue of the powers granted by a Monseigneur William Dallard indulte of October 1842 by the St. Siege Ad Decennium these faculties having been said we accordingly received consent mutual of their marriage and have given the nuptial benediction in the presence of  Francois Roi, Isaac LeBlanc

Marriage1 joseph

Thus, Joseph Roy was related to his first wife in two ways:

  • 3 to 3 (third degree): second cousins, sharing g-grandparents
  • 4 to 4 (fourth degree): third cousins, sharing 2nd g-grandparents

During my 2014 visit, Stephen A. White, consulted his notes and in minutes crafted the following to define the kinship:

consanguinity

Children of Joseph and Henriette included:

(1) Cyrille – baptized  20 November 1847, St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche.

(2) Pierre – baptized 30 November 1849, in St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche. Godparents were Pierre Hebert and Marie Roi.

(3) Libie (Lébée/Lybie?)– baptized 28 Dec 1851, in St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche; godparents were François Roy and Vénérande Savoie. It is possible that she died young, was adopted and/or the name “Libie” is in error, as it is not a “typical” name of the place/time. To date, she has not been found in other records.

(4) Hippolite – baptized 9 Feb 1853, in St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche; godparents were Louis Legere and Olive LeBlanc. He was not living with the Roy family in any census year and according to his marriage record, was adopted after his mother’s death by Eustache Poirier and his wife Cecile Legere (daughter of Simon Legere and Marie-Rose Arsenault and his mother Henriette’s biological cousin). He resided with them in 1871 in Grande-Digue and was enumerated as Hyppolyte Poirier. It is unknown whether he had a relationship with his biological family, nonetheless, with the exception of this census, all records seem to indicate that he used the Roy surname for his lifetime.

Henriette’s death was registered at St-Jean-Baptiste in Bouctouche : On 23 April 1853, Henriette Legere, 31 years old, spouse of Joseph Roi, died the “day before yesterday and was buried in the cemetery of this parish”.

Herietta death

Joseph married second, on 13 Nov 1855, (Judith) Angélique Beliveau, in Scoudouc, Westmorland, New Brunswick, Canada, daughter of Amand Belliveau and Natalie Bourgeois.

The marriage record reads:

Scoudouc, Westmoreland N.B., St Jacques- le 13 Novembre 1855, après la publication ordinince des bans de mariage entre Joseph Roy veuf majeure de défunt Léger de Bouctouche d’una part, et Angelique Beliveau fille mineure de Amand Beliveau et de Natalie Bourgeois de la missons de Squédouc, d’autre part ne s’étant découvert aucun empêchement et __ le consentement des parents nous prêtre soussigné avons  reçu leur mutual consentement de mariage et leur avons donne la benediction nuptiale en presence de Joseph Maillet et de Euphamie Beliveau qui ainsi que les époux niut su signer.

Which translates to something like:

Scoudouc, Westmoreland N.B., St Jacques- the 13 November 1855, after the publication of banns of marriage ordinance­­ between Joseph Roy, of legal age, widower of deceased Léger of Bouctouche on the one part and Angelique Beliveau minor daughter of Amand Beliveau and Natalie Bourgeois of the mission of Scoudouc on the other part, having received no impediment and having ___ consent from the parents we priest undersigned have received their mutual consent of marriage and have given them the nuptial blessing in the presence of Joseph Maillet and of Euphamie Beliveau which together with the spouses sign this night.

joseph marriage 2

 

Children of Joseph and Angelique included:
Docite/Dosithee, Sifroi, Henriette, Sylvain, Cécile, Vital, Olivier and Jude

1851/1861 Canadian Census

The 1851 Canadian census for Kent County did not survive.

By 1861, the family resided on a farm in the Parish of Wellington, Kent County (which included the area of St. Mary’s Parish until 1867) and used the surname King (English translation of Roy); they were Roman Catholic.

1861 census

  • Joseph, junior, age 31, farmer
  • Angélique, age 29, wife
  • Ceril, age 14, son [likely Cyrille]
  • Peter, age 12, son [likely Pierre]
  • Docité, age 4, son [see sketch week #4]
  • Cephor, age 3, son [likely Sifroi, baptized 12 November 1858, St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche. Godparent was Charles Maillet]
  • Onriette, age 1, daughter [likely Henriette, baptized 2 December 1860, St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche. Godparents were Jean C. Maillet and Marraine Henriette Bastarache]

Next door (or on a farm nearby) are Joseph’s likely paternal relatives:

  • Frank, junior, age 63, widower, farmer [Joseph’s father, Francois – According to Stephen White’s “La généalogie des trente-sept familles, hôtesses des « Retrouvailles 94 »  – SAVOIE , his wife, Vénérande,  died in Bouctouche 27 May 1858]
  • Olive. age 39, daughter [likely Joseph’s sister]
  • Onyez [Agnes ?], age 37, daughter [likely Joseph’s sister]
  • Frank, senior, age 92, lodger [likely Joseph’s paternal grandfather – Francois]

Joseph had 33 acres, of which 20 had been improved, valued at $150, with other farm machinery valued at $20.  He had no employees.  His father’s farm was quite similar (details in a future sketch).

His animals included: two horses; two milk cows; two working oxen; four sheep; and six swine/pigs.

He reported slaughtering 400 pounds of pork; netted eight pounds of wool; and created $20 of cloth (or similar manufactured products).  Eight acres of land was dedicated to production of hay (he netted three tons).  The farm produced 30 bushels of wheat (from three acres), eight bushels barley (from 1/2 acre), 50 bushels oats (from four acres), twelve bushels buckwheat (from one acre) and 300 bushels potatoes (from three acres).

The farm was likely situated in Bouctouche in the area labelled “Francis King” on the map (No100) below. Since Joseph’s mother, Vénérande,  died in Bouctouche in 1858; this further strengthens the case that they resided there.

Land deeds have not yet been examined fully.  The known grantor/grantee indexes for the Roy/King surnames in Kent County from 1827 to 1941 can be found here: New Brunswick Roy deeds

Francis King land

1861 agriculture frank and joseph

The census reported that none of Joseph’s children had attended school the prior year.  At that time, schooling was largely through traveling teachers who served many villages at once. It was not until the time of the Canadian Confederation, in 1867, that the Acadians were able to re-establish some semblance of their pre-expulsion society. At that time, schools were founded (although education was not highly valued in many areas and the offerings were not ideal for several decades) and the people began taking an active part in political life (as Catholic’s they were previously denied the right to vote or participate in the legislature). Although many continued to lived in abject poverty; a contributing factor being that Acadian farmers primarily held land along the coast, in less fertile areas.

1871 Canadian Census

In 1871 the family was enumerated (with four additional children) in Sainte-Marie-de-Kent (Olivier born 1870 was the first Roy child baptized in Ste Marie at Mont-Carmel), which in 1871 had a population of 100.

Sainte-Marie-de-Kent (often called Sainte-Marie) is a Canadian village in Kent County, New Brunswick. Today located in the parish of Saint Mary’s, which was established in 1867 from part of Wellington Parish; the same year Canada officially become a country. The village is located about 28 miles north of Moncton on North side of the Buctouche River, 1.4 miles North East of Upper Bouctouche. Its residents are largely Acadian, most of whom speak French in its local variant Chaic.

Map st Mary

map

  • Joseph, 42, cultivateur (farmer), can not read or write
  • Angelique, 40, can not read or write
  • Docitée, 13  
  • Sigefroi,12
  • Henriette,10
  • Sylvain, 9 [ baptized 12 December 1861, St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche. Godparents were Sylvain Maillet and Marraine Jeanette LeBlanc. Joseph’s middle name is given as Francois]
  • Cécile, 5 [baptized 4 June 1866, St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche. Godparents were Cyrille Roy and Cecile Allain]
  • Vitál, 8 [likely baptized 30 March 1868, St-Jean Parish in Bouctouche. Godparents were Edouard and Marraine Genevieve Belliveau.  Note that his mother is recorded as “Julie”, this was the only record in the parish that was likely the correct baptism for Vital, perhaps Julie is in error and it was meant to be Judith. His marriage record names Judith as his mother, and when he travels to the US in 1916 he gives a contact in Canada as a brother Sylvain.]
  • Olivier, 10 months [baptized 5 June 1870, at Ste. Marie de Mont-Carmel. Godparents were _____ Maillet and _____ Richard]

Joseph’s sons Cyrille and Pierre are residing together nearby, in Saint Marie, with Agnes Roy [sister of Joseph].  No other members of the King/Roy family were found nearby in 1861. A widowed Frances Roi, of the correct age to be Joseph’s father was found in Wellington residing with the family of Joseph & Mary Ferware (enumerated as Jerway in 1861 and two census pages away from the Roy’s in Wellington), perhaps Fougere?

Joseph and Angelique were unable to read or write (this question was only asked of those over age 20) but presumably no one in the family could read/write as none of the children were attending school.

Joseph, in 1871, seemed to own significantly more acreage than he did in 1961.  He had 125 acres of which 30 were improved and 12 were pasture (they did not have a garden). There were two dwelling houses on the property, one of which was uninhabited.  They had one barn or stable, two carriages or sleighs, 2 cars/wagons or sleds and one plough or cultivator.

Animals included:  one horses over 3 years old; two working oxen; three milk cows; one “other horned cattle”; six sheep – 6 (one was killed or sold for slaughter/export); five swine/pigs (one was killed or sold for slaughter/export)

The farm produced eight acres of wheat crops on which he netted the followings bushels – 30 of spring wheat (sown in the spring and is harvested in the fall), seven of barley, 60 of oats and 90 of buckwheat.  He had four acres of potatoes which netted 125 bushels.  He had two acres of hay which netted three-ton of 2,000 lbs or bundles of 16 lbs of hay and 40 bushels of apples.  The sheep netted 20 pounds of wool which produced 60 yards of home-made cloth or flannel.

Joseph did not appear to be involved with fishing, forestry or mineral products.  It is possible that he was involved with steel/iron as a Blacksmith “Ouvrages et réparations de Forgerons en tout genre” (Works and Repairs of Blacksmith of all kinds).  The schedule has a line through his name, it is unknown if the enumerator crossed this out or if it was done later – he was only involved in the business for 1/2 a month and although he had $40 in capital only made a few dollars. It could be a business that was discontinued that census year but was perhaps run in years prior.

1871 Canadian Census

1871 census bldgs

1871 census agriculture

1871 animals

1871 blacksmith

Sixteen people died in St Marie the prior year, most from consumption, malaria or diarrhea.  There were two Roy’s, likely related – schedule here.  Joseph’s father, who had lived near them in 1861, Francois Roy,  died 25 April 1875.

1881 Canadian Census (only schedule 1, population was preserved)

In 1881, the family continued to reside in the parish of Sainte-Marie (with one additional child):

  • Joseph, 52, cultivateur (farmer)
  • Angelique, 51
  • Silvin [Sylvain], 19
  • Aurietta [Henriette], 20
  • Cecille [Cécile], 15
  • Vitál, 13
  • Olivier, 11
  • Jude, 7 [baptized 24 June 1873, at Ste. Marie de Mont-Carmel. Godparents were Dosite Roy and Domtilda Cormier]
  • Docitée, 23 was listed as a widower and enumerated separately [the day after the remainder of the family was recorded, see margin notes], it appears that he resided on the same farm.

Jude and Vital were attending school (Olivier, age 11, was not marked as in school which may have been an enumerator error, although 1901, 1911 and 1921 censuses specify he can not read or write).

1881 census

Cyrille, his wife Genevieve, six children and Joseph’s sister, Agnes Roy live together in Sainte-Marie, as does Pierre, his wife Madeline, and four children, Sigefroi, his wife (name unreadable, likely Judeste) and daughter [E]ugenie. Hyppolyte/Hippolite resides in Moncton with his wife Marie Rose and two children; he is a farmer.  They are residing next door or possibly in the same home as Hyppolyte’s adoptive parents.

1891 Canadian Census (only schedule 1, population was preserved)

In 1891, Joseph and Angelique with a few of their children continue to reside in the parish of Sainte-Marie:

Joseph, 61, alt
Angelique, 60
Olivier, 20
Jude, 16

Next door [or possibly on the same farm] is their son Sylvain, his wife Marie and their 5 children;  nearby in Sainte-Marie are son Cyrille, his wife Genevieve, ten children and Joseph’s sister Agnes Roy, also son Pierre, his wife Madeline and seven children, son Docitée, his wife Victorie and their three children. Daughter Cécile is next door (or perhaps on the same farm) as her brother Docitée with her husband Jean Collet/Collette and two children.

Henrietta was in Wellington with her husband Domicien LeBlanc and three children. Sigefroi was living with his wife Adele and five children in Grande-Digue, Dundas Parish. Hippolite and Vitál were not definitively identified in the 1891 census.

census 1891

 

in 1898 St. Mary’s was a farming and fishing community with 1 post office, 4 stores, 1 cheese factory, 1 church and population had grown to about 1,000.

1901 Canadian Census (this census includes birth day, month and year)

In 1901 some of the family continues to reside in the parish of Sainte-Marie:

Joseph, 71, cultivator
Angelique, 69
Jude, 27

1901 Joseph

Next door [or possibly on the same farm] is the family of their son Olivier, his wife Celeste and their five children. Cyrille, his second wife Barbe and ten children also live in Sainte-Marie; two teenagers named Octavia & Henriette LeBlanc reside with them, he names them as daughters [perhaps step-daughters ?]. Also in  Sainte-Marie is their son Sylvain, with his wife Marie and nine children and Cécile who was residing with her husband Jean/John D. Collet/Collette with six children.

Docitée (enumerated as Doss King), his wife Victorie and their three children have relocated to Lancaster, Saint John, New Brunswick. Sigefroi was living with his wife Adele and five children in Grande-Digue, Dundas Parish.  Vitál was residing nearby in the Parish of Wellington, with wife Margerite and four children.  Pierre, Hippolite  and Henrietta were not definitively identified in the 1901 census.

1911 Canadian Census

Angelique, noted as a farmer’s wife, died on 13 March 1907 at age 77, the cause was “decline”, she had been ill “all winter”. She is likely buried in St Mary’s.

angeliques death

6e34d2ac-362d-445b-a5bd-787de11e6eeb

In 1911 a widowed Joseph and his widowed son Jude, reside in the parish of Sainte-Marie on the farm now owned by his son Docite’s family:

Docite, 53, cultivateur (farmer)
Victorie, 46
Pius, 24 [my g-grandfather]
Laura, 19 [Pius’ wife; my g-grandmother]
Joseph, 83, retired
Jude, 47

1911 census Joseph

Olivier was still in Ste Marie with his wife Celeste and eleven children. He was a farmer. Cyrille was also enumerated in St Mary’s with his second wife and several children. Pierre resided in Dundas with his wife Madeline and two children near Sigefroi who resided there with his wife and several children.

Sylvain was enumerated in Moncton under the surname King, at 7 Harper’s, with his wife Marie, four children and three young boarders all using the surname King (likely relatives). Interestingly, his wife is listed as head of household and he is enumerated as “husband”.  The only death certificate located for a Sylvain Roy of the right age, gives his death as 1910 at St. Mary’s; he may be deceased but was somehow mistakenly enumerated, which would explain why his wife is listed as head of household.

Hennrietta, Cécile & Vital were not definitively identified in the 1911 census. Hippolite died 18 Jun 1911 in Grande-Digue; his family has not been located in the 1911 census.

Joseph died suddenly on 26 May 1913  of “old age” and is likely buried in St Mary’s; he was 84 and a retired farmer.

jos death 2

Joseph death

 

Probate records do not survive for Kent County.

Joseph was the subject of a past blog post, which can be found here; although not comprehensive and likely having errors, it includes additional details of Joseph’s children and many of his grandchildren.

Comments, corrections and updates appreciated!

My Acadian 30 – week #7, Ausithe/Osite Dupuis

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO SEE A LARGER VERSION!

In 2007, I joined Ancestry.com.  It never occurred to me that online, unsourced trees were inaccurate.  I essentially “copied” my entire Acadian family from potentially erroneous public trees and never looked back.  Although my newer entries are sourced, a visit to Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies] in 2014,  revealed a number of errors. I am determined to start from scratch, and verify that I have all available records beginning with the 30 direct ancestors, connected to my maternal grandmother. This includes her parents, grandparents, g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents.

yvonne roy

To keep the project manageable, I will write of one ancestor each week.

Prior Weeks (click on a name to read the sketch)

Generation 1

Week #1 – Yvonne Marie (Roy) Billings

Generation 2

Week #2 – Pius/Paul Dost Roy

Week #3 –  Marie Laura “Laura” Melanson

Generation 3

Week #4 –  Docité OR Dosithée Roy

Week #5 – Victoire LeBlanc

Week #6 – Magloire Melanson

7. Ausithe/Osite/Osithe Dupuis, daughter of Jean-Bénoni DuPuis and Nathalie Boudreau, was born on 15 Jun 1867 (Registres de la paroissede Memramcook, vol/page M-27A) and baptized as Marie Ausithe Dupuis at Memramcook, Westmorland, New Brunswick the following day. She was perhaps born in Scoudouc.   Scoudouc would not become a parish until 1907; it was therefore administered by priests from Memramcook, Saint-Anselme, or Shediac.

Ausithe’s marriage record lists a birthplace of Scoudouc; death record lists a birthplace of Memramcook, her parents were enumerated in the district of Dorchester in 1861 and Scoudouc at Dorchester Road in Shediac Parish in 1871 .

Onsite birth

Known siblings (found in the Registres de la paroisse de Memramcook, index général 1806-1900 – document here) include:

  • Eustache: b. 30 Jun 1854, Memramcook vol/page 8-64
  • Marie: b. 13 May 1857 Memramcook vol/page 8-131; buried 14 April 1868 Memramcook vol/page M-53
  • Ferdinand: b. 15 Nov 1859, Memramcook vol/page 9-20 – twin
  • Philias #1: b. 15 Nov 1859 Memramcook vol/page 9-20 – twin; buried 25 Dec 1859 Memramcook vol/page 9-24
  • Philias #2: b. 15 Jun 1862, Memramcook vol/page 9-90
  • Antoine: b. 16 Oct 1864, Memramcook vol/page 9-174 AND
  • Bibianne: who was baptized May 1871 at St Jacques, Scoudouc (image on Ancestry.com here)

1871 census – Ausithe was three and enumerated as Osit, in Scoudouc at Dorchester Road in Shediac Parish, with her parents and siblings; she is a neighbor to her future husband, Magloire Melanson [see red arrow in image].

The family is indexed on Ancestry.com as:

William, 47 [likely Jean-Bénoni]
Sarah, 44, [likely Nathalie]
Natash, 15, [likely Eustache]
Fardinan, 11, [likely Ferdinand]
Phileos, 8, [likely Philias]
Antony, 5, [likely Antoine]
Osit, 3, [likely Ausithe]
Libane, 1/12, [likely Bibianne]
John Dupee 80, [“John” is likely related to Jean-Bénoni, but the relationship is unknown].

Ausithe’s parents and John can not read or write (the census question was only asked of those over age 20). No one in the family was attending school.

Laurent land

1871 Dupuis

In 1871, Ausithe’s father owned 100 acres of land, twelve of which were improved, with one dwelling house.  They had one plow or cultivator and one car/wagon or sled.

The farm appeared to be much smaller that that of their Melanson neighbors. They produced twenty-five bushels of oats, fourteen of buckwheat and fifteen of potatoes.

The family had no horses, one milk cow, two sheep and two swine/pigs (one pig was exported or slaughtered).  They produced seven pounds of wool and thirty yards of homemade cloth/flannel.

Jean-Bénoni also lumbered 125 standard spruce and other logs, two cords of tan bark (which might have been used for fuel) and four cords of firewood.

schedule 3 Dupuis

schedule 4 Dupuis

schedule 5 Dupuis

schedule 7 Dupuis

Ausithe’s father died between 1871 and 1881.  His death entry has not been located in parish or civil records.

1881 census – Ausithe was 14, enumerated as Osite, in Scoudouc at Dorchester Road, Shediac Parish, with her widowed mother and siblings; although the census microfilm is unreadable in places, she is still a neighbor of the Melansons.  No one in the family is attending school.

The family is indexed on Ancestry.com as:

Ferdinand 20, farmer
Natallie  53, [Nathalie]
Eustash  26, farm laborer [Eustache]
Phillias  18, farm laborer [Philias]
Osite  14, [Ausithe]
Bibienne  9, [Bibianne]

1881 dupuis

On Sunday, 8 Feb 1891, Ausithe/Osite Dupuis married Magloire Melanson son of Laurent Melanson and Pélagie Leger.

On that date, Magloire was reported as a farmer residing in “Scoudouc near Shediac” (likely Dorchester Road; the same farm owned by his father).  They were neighbors and likely knew one another their entire lives. Father Louis-Joseph-Octave Lecours, of the College of Saint Joseph in Memramcook, who was in charge of the Scoudouc mission for 24 years, until 1892, was the officiating clergyman.  The couple was married at the church of Scoudouc, near Shediac (St. Jacques), in the presence of witnesses Joseph Bourque and Bibiane Dupuis (Ausithe’s sister).

To view several old church photos, on the McCord Museum website – click here

osite sa white card2

Onsite marriage2

1891 census – Later that year, the couple was enumerated in Scoudouc, Shediac Parish, with Magloire listed as a general laborer; it seems he had assumed the position of head of household on his late father’s farm. Although it is his brother Peter/Pierre who is noted with the occupation of farmer. Living with them were Magloire’s widowed mom and Magloire’s single siblings:

  • Magloire,laborer, 25
  • Osite, 23
  • Peter [Pierre], farmer, 21
  • Pélagie, general house, 56
  • Osite, servant, 23
  • Madeleine, servant, 21
  • Marie, 13
  • Zelica, 9

No one in the family could read or write.

Ausithe’s widowed mother, a few brothers and their families are still nearby, running her deceased father’s farm.

1891

Scoudouc in 1893

L’école aux apparitions mystérieuses, Bourgeois, Philéas-Frédéric, published 1896 (https://archive.org/details/cihm_00208), is a book of the testimonies of the children between ages seven and eleven, and a few adults, who supposedly saw apparitions of the Virgin Mary in the local school at Scoudouc, in the fall of 1893. The book is of further value as it describes life in Scoudoc and the school at Dorchester Road, likely the school of the Dupuis and Melanson children (although it is unclear if any of my direct ancestors actually attended school).  Since Ausithe and Magloire married in 1891, neither they or their children were likely present to see the apparitions, but were surely friends, neighbors and relatives of those quoted.

Following is an excerpt (with the aid of google translate; since I don’t know French):

The mission of Scoudouc is located in the county Westmoreland, New Brunswick, midway, or so between Memramcook and Shediac. It’s rugged plain contrasts with the mountainous terrain rising south and southwest of the county. Here, the traveler will not find around town the church, as in most of the parishes of the province of Quebec and some of ours in Acadia. All householders are farmers; they are mounted on a corner of their percent acres of land, and this is what explains why houses are scattered over a distance of four or five miles. The soil of this area is very fertile, and people who deal exclusively with the culture of their land, reap, year after year, an abundant yield to maintain in a modest competence….

The mission today is close to a hundred and twenty families. Its inhabitants are labor serious, sober, honest and good Catholics. They obey the priest with a primitive docility and their piety and obedience to the divine offices are in general, really uplifting. In most families, the rosary is recited together, every night of the year”…

schoolhouse

Processions are made ​​to the honor of the Blessed Virgin, the faithful always attend. Hence one can conclude that devotion to the Mother of God is firmly rooted in the heart of these populations and that if, in our country, a group of Catholics deserved special favors from Mother which is in heaven, it is the faithful of St. Jacques, Scoudouc. We have already said that this mission extends over an area of ​​several square miles. it includes the District of Scoudouc itself and those of Painsec, Meadow Brook and Dorchester Road.  The latter village is so-called because of  the first group of settlers in District Shédiac in the direction of DorchesterIt is located two miles from the church Scoudouc, on the way to Shediac. In the area ​​Dorchester Road, we see a rising school at the corner of the highway and Belliveau, whose direction is west to east. It is a building of 32 x 20 feet and its appearance is poor both within and outside.  In front of the school, there are willows to shade the children where they go to sit or to rest after their games, or to shelter from the sun in the summer. The path of Belliveau and small yard adjacent to the school provide a place of recreation  for students. The interior of this village school is as simple and humble in appearance  A large pole of wood stands in the middle of the aisle, there are twenty-two desks. At the bottom of the class, there is a desk reserved for the teacher. Behind this desk stands a table in black to use for writing, arithmetic and mathematics lessons. A large world map runs until the bottom of the wall,  the interior is covered with wall paper whose background is yellow”…

Ausithe’s death – 1897

Ausithe died on 28 Aug 1897, age 30 and 2 months, of consumption, after two years of illness, in Scoudouc and was buried two days later. Her children were about five and two. They were likely raised by their grandmothers and aunts (who were neighbors) and later their step-mother Judith Cormier.

No photos of Ausithe are known to exist, but she perhaps resembled her sister Bibianne, pictured below.

Bibianne

onsite death

osite burial record

My Acadian 30 – week #6, Magloire Melanson

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO SEE A LARGER VERSION!

In 2007, I joined Ancestry.com.  It never occurred to me that online, unsourced trees were inaccurate.  I essentially “copied” my entire Acadian family from potentially erroneous public trees and never looked back.  Although my newer entries are sourced, a visit to Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies] in 2014,  revealed a number of errors. I am determined to start from scratch, and verify that I have all available records beginning with the 30 direct ancestors, connected to my maternal grandmother. This includes her parents, grandparents, g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents.

yvonne roy

To keep the project manageable, I will write of one ancestor each week.

Prior Weeks (click on a name to read the sketch)

Generation 1

Week #1 – Yvonne Marie (Roy) Billings

Generation 2

Week #2 – Pius/Paul Dost Roy

Week #3 –  Marie Laura “Laura” Melanson

Generation 3

Week #4 –  Docité OR Dosithée Roy

Week #5 – Victoire LeBlanc

The Melanson surname is unique in the fact that it’s use can be traced to the family of Pierre Laverdure and his wife Priscilla, who likely landed in Acadia in 1657, onboard the ship Satisfaction after sailing from England with their sons, Pierre and Charles, the first to take the surname “Mellanson”.   They were known as Pierre Mellanson dit La Verdure and Charles Mellanson dit La Ramée.  The “dit” name is essentially an alias or nickname used by the French, read more about “dit” names here.   A interesting account of this family (one of my favorite books) has been written: The Melanson story : Acadian family, Acadian times; 2nd edition, July 2014 by Margaret C. Melanson, with a preface by Stephen A. White.

The Melanson Genealogy is well researched  and has been published by Michael B. Melanson of Dracut, Massachusetts, in “Melanson ~ Melançon: The Genealogy of an Acadian and Cajun Family”. This hardcover has 1,040 pages, a 20,000+ person index, complete footnotes and a full bibliography. It covers the Melanson and Melançon descendants of Pierre and Charles Mellanson, to the early twentieth century. If you are a Melanson, it is a “must” for your collection.

On pages 305, 565-566 Magloire’s line which begins after me, my mom and my grandmother, starts with his daughter Laura, then our subject Magloire, and continues with Laurent, Firmin, David, Pierre dit Parrotte, Charles, Charles Mellanson dit La Ramée, back to Pierre Laverdure.

6. Magloire Melanson, son of Laurent Melanson and Pélagie Leger, was born at Scoudouc, Westmorland, New Brunswick, Canada on 18 February 1862. He was baptized five days later at Église (Church) de Saint-Jacques (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FLR3-RF2); godparents were Jude Melancon and M. Modeste Leger. They were Roman Catholic.

birth Maglorie

Scoudouc

According to Wikipedia (French to English translation): Scoudouc was founded in 1809 by 11 families from Minoudie and Memramcook , it was a farming community.  On 6 May 1815, 6,000 acres of land were officially granted to: David Melanson [Magloire’s g-grandfather], Mathurin Comeau, Pierre Melanson senior, Dominique Melanson, Fabien Melanson, Laurent Bourque, Maximin Leblanc, Laurent Melanson, François Comeau, Jean Leblanc, François Lightweight, John Melanson, Pierre Babin, Romain Pierre Melanson and Bourque . Scoudouc would not become a parish until 1907. It was therefore administered by priests from Memramcook, Saint-Anselme, or Shediac.

Laurent land`

Pélagie gave birth to at least 13 children. Magloire was her seventh known child and second of that name.  The first Magloire was born 28 Oct 1860 and died 24 April 1861 (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FLGF-BV2). In that time period, a common naming custom involved parents giving a subsequent child the same name as their deceased offspring.

Other known siblings include: Maximin, Nazaire, Rosalie, Olive, Alexandre, Osite, Pierre, Madeleine, Patrice, Marie-Exilda and Zelica.

In 1871, a 9 year old Magloire (indexed on Ancestry.com as “Mack Malonson”) was living with his parents and eight siblings in Scoudouc, Shediac Parish, a farming community population 500; his dad is a farmer. It seems that Magloire’s future wife Ansithe/Osite Dupuis is a neighbor [see the red arrow in the image].

  • Lorang [Laurent], 44
  • Pélagie, 35
  • Nazaire, 17
  • Rose, 16
  • Olivia, 13
  • Alexandre, 12
  • Mack, 9
  • Osite, 5
  • Peter [Pierre], 3
  • Madeleine, 2

Magloire’s parents can not read or write (the census question was only asked of those over age 20). Only Nazaire is noted as attending school.

1871 census Magloire

In 1870, 21 residents of the village died, most from consumption (tuberculosis).  There were two Melanson’s listed, an infant and a four-year old, likely related to Magloire; schedule here.

Magloire’s father owned 100 acres of land,  80 of which was improved and included one dwelling house and one barn/stable.  They had one plow or cultivator.  The family had one horse over three years old, one milk cow and one swine/pig.  They produced twenty pounds of butter and twenty yards of homemade cloth/flannel.

They dedicated one acre to producing twenty-five bushels of buckwheat.  Another acre produced 150 bushels of potatoes.  Six acres were dedicated to producing the hay crop (six tons of 2,000 pound bundles of 16 pounds of hay), one bushel flax-seed and ten pounds of flax or hemp.

Laurent seemed to be involved in the lumber business, the farm produced 1,300 cubic feet square of timber and 100 standard spruce and other logs and ten cords of firewood.

Laurent 1871 census

In 1881, 18-year-old Magloire (indexed on Ancestry.com as “Magloir Malonson”) was a laborer, living with his parents and seven siblings in Scoudouc,  Shediac Parish. None of the children were attending school. The family included:

  • Lorang [Laurent], farmer, 63
  • Pélagie, 48
  • Alexandre, laborer, 22
  • Magloire, laborer, 18
  • Osite, 17
  • Pierre, 13
  • Madeleine, 12
  • Zelica, 0 (born March)

Magloire’s future wife Ansithe/Osite Dupuis is the next family listed in the census, and perhaps lives next door or down the road [see the red arrow in the image].

1881 Magloire

Main St

On 14 September 1881 Magloire’s father died at age 62 (cause unknown).

On Sunday, 8 Feb 1891, Magloire, married Ausithe/Osite Dupuis,  daughter of Jean-Bénoni DuPuis and Nathalie Boudreau,  likely a girl he had known his entire life.  On that date, Magloire was reported as a farmer residing in “Scoudouc near Shediac” (likely in an area known as Dorchester Road; the same farm owned by his father). The couple was married, with the consent of their parents, at the church of Scoudouc, near Shediac (St. Jacques), in the presence of witnesses Joseph Bourque and Bibiane Dupuis (Ausithe’s sister).

osite sa white card2

Onsite marriage2

marriage

Later that year, the couple was enumerated in Scoudouc, Shediac Parish, with Magloire listed as a general laborer; it seems he had assumed the position of head of household on his late father’s farm. Although it is his brother Peter/Pierre who is noted with the occupation of farmer. Living with them were Magloire’s widowed mom and single siblings:

  • Magloire,laborer, 25
  • Osite, 23
  • Peter [Pierre], farmer, 21
  • Pélagie, general house, 56
  • Osite, servant, 23
  • Madeleine, servant, 21
  • Marie, 13
  • Zelica, 9

No one in the family could read or write.

1891

*Clarification from cousin Michael Melanson 29 Jan 2014: “The confusion regarding Scoudouc and Shediac comes about because Scoudouc is an area within Shediac Parish. The nineteenth-century censuses in Westmorland County were done by parish (with the town rarely mentioned) and, sometimes, the word parish was omitted. Since Shediac was both a town and parish, it can lead to a lot of confusion. In 1891, Magloire Melanson and his family were living on his late father’s farm in Scoudouc.

The issue regarding Sackville is something else entirely. There appear to have been some issues with the microfilming (and subsequent digital scanning) of the 1891 census of Westmorland County, NB. I’m not privy to what actually occurred. However, in this case, some of Shediac Parish was tacked onto the end of Sackville Parish. At the top of each census page on the right is a notation as to the “S. Division” (subdivision) which was noted by a letter. Sackville was the letter “E”. Shediac was the letter “G”. The page with Magloire’s family was noted as “G” div. 1, p. 20. [It would have been a lot easier if they had filled in the name of the place ….] If you go back three pages, you’ll find “E” div. 3, p. 70, which was Sackville. Ten pages (with two census sheets on each page) of Shediac were (accidentally) added to the end of Sackville during the microfilming process. This was never corrected, so now digitalized copies (such as on Ancestry.com) have this part of Shediac noted as Sackville in the search engine. I’ve found similar issues in other localities in the 1891 census, which makes the research all more challenging”.

Magloire and Ausithe had two daughters.  Laura Marie [my grandmother] born 23 Mar 1892 and Marie Melesse Belzemie “Nelsey” born 16 Nov 1894, in Scoudouc. 

Ausithe/Osite died on 25 Aug 1897 in Scoudouc at age 30 after a 2 year illness of “consumption” (likely  tuberculosis) – https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XG4S-SZD.

I have not located Magloire in Canada in 1901, but Magloire’s daughters, Laura and Melesse lived with their widowed paternal grandmother,Pélagie (Leger) Melanson, and four paternal unmarried aunts Rose, Magdeline, Marie and Zelica, on the family farm which continues to be run by their 27-year-old unmarried uncle, Pierre Melanson (Laura’s godfather), in an area known as “Dorchester Road/Malakoff”,  in Shediac Parish.  His mother’s death certificate (1918) lists her place of residence as Malakoff.  Next door (or very close by) lived Magloire’s brother-in-law (Ausithe’s brother) Phillas Dupuis who likely took over his father’s farm. His wife, children and Ausithe’s mother, Nathalie (Boudreau) Dupuis reside with him. Other Melansons and Dupuis lived nearby, likely all related.

Scoudouc included the community of Dorchester Crossing which in 1898 was a farming and lumbering settlement with 1 post office, 1 sawmill, 1 grist mill and a population of 250. Nearby Shediac was a sub-port of entry and a station on the Intercolonial Railway and had 1 post office, 13 stores, 2 hotels, 1 boot factory, 2 steam sawmills, 1 flour mill, 1 tannery, 3 carriage factories, 5 churches, 1 convent, and a population of 2,000.

1901 Laura

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2014-09-13 08.27.52
Photo from my 2014 trip to NB

Magloire married second, Judith Cormier, on 26 May 1902, Acadian daughter of George Cormier and Madeleine LeBlanc in Scoudouc. It was her first marriage. They had two known children Antoine, born 1903, who died at 10 months, 12 days, cause unknown and Marie Alida, born 1905, both in Shediac.

9d8a8112-e95d-496a-9aaf-dbb75a486e23
Magloire, Judith and Alida circa 1912

Around 1907/8 Magloire relocated to Gardner, Worcester County, Massachusetts.

gardner2

gardner

Central Street, Gardner circa 1908

In 1932, when his daughter Laura Marie Melanson returned  from a visit to Canada, she stated that she had resided in the US from 1908-1911 and 4/12/1916-11/11/1932. It is likely that she resided with her father and step-mother upon arrival in 1908. She was married in 1910 and returned to Canada where she resided with her in-laws for 5 years.

melanson arrivalAncestry.com

In 1909, Magloire appears in the Gardner, Massachusetts city directories living on 184 Reagan Street and working for Heywood-Wakefield Company, a US manufacturer of wicker and rattan furniture established in Gardner in 1897.

7a01309c-2721-4294-947a-974162019b5e

In 1910, Magloire (48), Judith (45), Laura (18), Melesse (15) and Alida (5) resided at 184 Reagan Street, a rented home. Magloire runs a circular saw at a wood chair shop, he is the only member of the household who can not read or write.  He has not become a US citizen.  Judith is a self employed washer woman, Laura and Melesse also work and are not attending school.

1910 census

The 1912 city directory places Magloire at 27 Reagan in Gardner, still working for H Bros & W Co., in 1914 and 1915 his address is given as 31 Regan (we don’t know if they moved a few doors away or if perhaps the house numbers changed).

The 1920 census places him at 137 Connors in Gardner.  He is not a citizen and is working as a planer at a chair shop, Judith is not working.  Alida (14) resides at home.  Magloire and Judith have two lodgers, Albert and Arthur LeBlanc (likely relatives) and rent in a 3 family home with a Landry and LeBlanc family in the other units. Daughter Melesse, her husband and 4 boys are next door at 139 Connors. Daughter Laura and her husband are about a half mile away on Parker Street with 5 children and a lodger.

1920census

By 1923 Magloire and Judith purchased a home at 88 Nichols, Gardner (it was valued at $7,000 in 1930 and Judith is listed as the widowed owner, it is a multi unit home; her renters were paying $28 monthly in 1930 & 1940). In June 1948 the home caught fire (sadly Alida died at age 43 in the fire while trying to save her youngest son) the photos below depict what the home likely looked like when Magloire resided there.

alida death

house2

photo courtesy http://www.gardnerfirefighters.org/history/

house

Magloire’s known residences, all a block apart were less than a mile from his work location. The French inhabitants of Gardner sought to preserve their culture; as a result, they established a community within a community. They first established themselves in the Park Street area, which became known as “Little Canada”. As more arrived, French residential and businesses flourished in the area of Nichols, Parker (home of the Roy’s), and West Street. The Nichols Street area with church, school, hotel and small shops formed the heart of the French community and eventually became the center of activity for both Canadians and Acadians who assimilated themselves within this community to become one.

In 1917 the Fitchburg Sentinel published the following compilation from the 1915 census. Of 5,821 foreign born residents, about 1/3 were of Canada, 426 of them from New Brunswick.

1915 statistics

mapGooglemaps

Magloire died of Chronic Interstitial Nephritis (a kidney condition characterized by swelling in between the kidney tubules), on 17 Sep 1926, in Gardner, Worcester, Massachusetts.

Fitchburg Sentinel, 18 Sept 1926, page 4: “Magloire Melanson, 64, of 88 Nichols street, died in his home yesterday. Born in Scoudouc, New Brunswick, son of Laurent and Pelagie (Leger) Melanson he had made his home in this city for the past 17 years. He leaves his wife Judith (Cormier) Melanson; three daughters, Mrs. Paul Roy, Mrs. Thaddee Landry and Alida Melanson, all of Gardner; a brother Pierre of Scoudouc, NB and five sisters, Mrs. Rose Bourgeois, Mrs. Phillip Donnell, Mrs. Zelica Leger, Mrs. Pierre Foster and Mrs. O. Melanson all of Shediac, NB. The funeral will be held tomorrow at 2 in the Holy Rosary Church. Burial will be in the St. John’s cemetery.”

The obituary claims burial in the St. John’s cemetery, his death certificate places him at Notre Dame Cemetery. His grave has not been located.

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91b3a714-9fa5-4595-9250-a4ec26f105fe

Magliore’s second wife, Judith is remembered by Laura’s daughter, Alida:  Judith did not like Magloire’s daughter Laura and was very mean to her, but seemed to adore her step-daughter Melesse with whom she shared the two family home. When her step-granddaughter Alida and her brother stopped by the house after school to pick up the newspaper, Judith would scream at them in a threatening manner as they approached, making sure they did not make it past the front porch.

Strangely, in later years, she would call Laura’s youngest daughter Alida (who resided with Laura), every Sunday, and insist she be picked up and brought to Athol farm for Sunday dinner.

Judith passed away 18 August 1957.  Her biological grandchildren (her daughter Alida’s children) inherited the home and it remained in the family until October 2009.

That’s it  –  Was he a good dad/husband? Who were his friends? Did he belong to any clubs? Was he involved in his church? Why did he relocate to Gardner – for work? How did he get into the chair building profession?

With at least 20 grandchildren, Magloire’s descendants are likely numerous.  His daughter Laura married Pius/Paul Roy and gave birth to 8 known children.  Melesse married Theodore/Thadee Landry and  gave birth to at least 9.  Alida married Maxime Lavoie and had at least 3.  There are 21 public trees on Ancestry.com who include Magloire. My research plan includes some cousin tracking, locating the original land deed for Nichols Street and searching for a probate record with hopes to learn a bit more of his life.

My Acadian 30 – week #5, Victoire LeBlanc

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO SEE A LARGER VERSION!

In 2007, I joined Ancestry.com.  It never occurred to me that online, unsourced trees were inaccurate.  I essentially “copied” my entire Acadian family from potentially erroneous public trees and never looked back.  Although my newer entries are sourced, a visit to Stephen A. White, at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies] in 2014,  revealed a number of errors. I am determined to start from scratch, and verify that I have all available records beginning with the 30 direct ancestors, connected to my maternal grandmother. This includes her parents, grandparents, g-grandparents and g-g-grandparents.

yvonne roy

To keep the project manageable, I will write of one ancestor each week.

Prior Weeks (click on a name to read the sketch)

Generation 1

Week #1 – Yvonne Marie (Roy) Billings

Generation 2

Week #2 – Pius/Paul Dost Roy

Week #3 –  Marie Laura “Laura” Melanson

Generation 3

Week #4 –  Docité OR Dosithée Roy

My 2nd g-grandmother was Victoire LeBlanc.  Sadly we know nothing of her personality and little of her life.  There are no known photos. An immigration card describes her as 5’6″, 140 pounds, of medium complexion, brown hair and eyes.  We can assume that because she was the eldest child, born in 1865, to an Acadian farmer, she likely took on the burden of aiding her mother in running the farm, household, and raising ten siblings.  She was likely uneducated. She became a farmer’s wife, and the hard work continued between the farm and raising nine of her own children, five of whom she lost as infants or in their youth, she later lost a sixth child who was a young woman living in Massachusetts with five children of her own. As young adults, three of Victoire’s children left for Gardner, Massachusetts in hopes of a better life; only one remained close by. Victoire’s was a difficult life, yet she was likely surrounded by a large support system of close-knit family and friends, in their small picturesque village in New Brunswick.  Alcoholism was rampant in future generations and may have affected Victoire as well. She did attempt to join her children in a strange new country at the age of 57.  Although the area was filled with fellow French-speaking Canadians and Acadians, it must have been difficult.  She soon returned to her homeland and likely had little communication with her loved ones in Massachusetts since she could not read or write well, if at all.

5. Victoire LeBlanc, daughter and eldest child of Georges LeBlanc and Madeleine LeBlanc, was likely born on 1 May 1865 and baptized the same day at Bouctouche, New Brunswick. Godparents were Julien and Basilisque [Basilice ?] LeBlanc (further research needed, but likely relatives). The 1901 census claims a birth date of 25 Apr 1865, however we do not know who spoke to the census taker.  The church record is more likely to be accurate as the entry was likely recorded by a person who had first hand knowledge of the event and close to the date of the actual event.

This birth year matches up with an immigration record dated 9 Dec 1922, where Victoire claims to be age 57 (image towards the end of this post; she is traveling to her son Edmund’s home).  She lists a birthplace of “St Mary’s”.  Residents of that area were baptized, married and buried in Bouctouche until the arrival, in St Mary’s Parish, of Ste-Marie’s Mont-Carmel’s first resident pastor in 1870. Since Victoire was not present at her own birth, she may have just reported St Mary’s since that is where she resided as a child.  She likely was born in Bouctouche as stated in the church record. Her father’s land deeds have not yet been examined to determine if the family moved or if they stayed put and the parish boundary changed.

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In this time frame and area, there were two Georges LeBlanc’s and two Madeleine LeBlanc’s, each a brother/sister pair:

– Joseph LeBlanc & Marguerite Collet had a son name Georges and a daughter named Madeleine.

– Sifroi LeBlanc & Victoire Bastarache had a son name Georges and a daughter named Madeleine.

Just to make things confusing for future family historians, George #1 married Madeleine #2 and George #2 married Madeleine #1.

Stephen A. White at Moncton University’s Centre d’Études Acadiennes [Center for Acadian Studies], has sorted out these families. My 2nd g-grandmother Victoire LeBlanc descends from Georges of Sifroi LeBlanc & Victoire Bastarache and Madeleine of Joseph LeBlanc & Marguerite Collet. There are many trees in cyberspace that have them mixed up!!  To see Stephan’s comments and photocopies of his documentation, read my blog post here.

According to Stephan A. White, Victoire had ten known siblings:

  • Henriette, Matilde, Vitaline, Eugenie, Zelie, Nerie, Marguerite, Adelard, Sara and Annie

Stephen has been working these families for decades!  He has been able to determine the likelihood of who was married to whom and born to whom because he has studied the entire Acadian population.  There are likely additional analyses and records to which I do not have access or that I have not reviewed (i.e. all of the birth/marriage/death records of each of their children).  Yet another reason to return to Moncton! (on a future trip to Moncton, I will copy the related index cards, which will make it easier to find them in the church registers).

In 1871, Victoire’s family was enumerated in Wellington Parish (possibly in or near Ste Marie; Wellington was established in 1814 and included Saint Mary Parish until 1867) .

  • George, 27 (unable to read or write);
  • Madeleine, 27 (unable to write);
  • Victoire, 6;
  • Henriette, 4;
  • Matilde, 2;
  • Vitaline, 2 months

1871 leblanc

Victoire’s father owned 50 acres of land, 25 of which was improved and included one dwelling house and one barn/stable.  They had two carriages/sleighs; four cars/wagons or sleds; two plows or cultivators.  The family had one horse over three years old, five sheep and four swine/pigs.  Two swine had been killed or sold for slaughter or export. They produced nice pounds of wool; thirty-three yards of homemade cloth/flannel and three yards of homemade linen.

They dedicated one acre to producing five bushels of spring wheat, one bushel of barley, 300 bushels of oats, 15 bushels of rye and 35 bushels of buckwheat.  Two acres produced 160 bushels of potatoes and two bushels of turnips.  One and half acres were dedicated to producing the hay crop (one ton of 2,000 pound bundles of 16 pounds of hay), one and a half bushels flax-seed and five pounds of flax or hemp. He also produced 100 pounds of maple syrup. The land produced sixteen cords of firewood.

bushels

Georges was a fisherman. He did not own any type of water vessel but reported  23 fathoms of nets and seizes of all sorts (a fathom is about six feet) . He caught 1/3 barrel gaspareaux (name of a common salt-water fish of Acadia, also called alewife), ten barrels of oysters and 10 barrels of other fishes (not defined – see list of fishes that were categorized in image below).

1871 leblanc

In 1881, the family was enumerated in Ste Marie, St Mary’s Parish. Victoire was not attending school.

  • George, 38;
  • Madeleine, 38;
  • Victoire, 15;
  • Henriette, 13 (attending school);
  • Matilde, 11  (attending school);
  • Eugenie, 8;
  • Milie Zeliah (Zelie), 6,
  • Nerie, 1;
  • Marguerite, 1 month

1881 census george

On Monday, 11 May 1885, Victoire, married Docité OR Dosithée Roy at Ste Marie de Mont Carmel, son of Joseph Roy/Roi and Angélique Beliveau. Witnesses were Pierre L. Roy and Maria Blanche (?) Bastarache.

marriage Victoria

roy leblanc marriage

Victoire’s married life and children are documented in the sketch’s of her husband and son Pius (see weeks 2 & 4 sketches).

As mentioned in Pius’ sketch, known children born to the Victoire and Docite include: (1)Pius/Paul, (2) Marie Albina, (3) Mathilde, (4) Marie Emma, (5) Aurelie, (6 & 7) Dieudonné #1 and Joseph Hector (twins), (8) Edmund and (9) Dieudonné #2

Sadly, four of the children likely died in 1899.  Joseph Hector, 1 Jan 1899 [cause unreadable], age 4 months;  Marie Albina, 13 April 1899, age 10, of consumption [likely influenza]; and a week later, 20 April 1899, Dieudonné (7 months) of la grippe [likely influenza]. No further record of Aurelie has been located, he likely died in the same time frame.

Victoire’s father, Georges died of consumption (tuberculosis) and was buried 14 Feb 1891 in Ste Marie; he was 47.

In 1891 she resided in St Mary’s parish (see Docite’s sketch).  Her Mother and siblings living at home were living nearby [her mother was on image 34 and Victoire on image 36 of the census, with many LeBlanc families, likely related, in between]:

  •  Madeleine, 47 (widow);
  • Eugenie 18;
  • Zelia 16,
  • Niry (Nerie), 11;
  • Marguerite, 9;
  • Dolore (Adelard), 8;
  • Sara, 6;
  • Anne, 4;
  • Georges Roy, 2 (no relationship listed – likely Madeleine had taken in her grandson, son of Henriette’s. Henriette had married her sister Victoire’s brother-in-law (Docite’s brother) Vital Roy.  Henriette died in 1890, of consumption; sadly her son Georges died at age three in 1892 of la grippe, likely influenza).

madeleine 1891

Victoire’s mother remarried to Marc LeBlanc son of Joachim and Prudentienne Maillet, widower of Cécile Bastarache  on 22 May 1893 in Ste Marie. He died, 8 June 1919, age 66 in Ste Marie of heart and kidney trouble. They had no known children together.

By 1901, Victoire’s family had moved from their rural community to the “big city”, Lancaster (today part of Saint John), New Brunswick.  After a few year, it seems Docité, Victoire, Mathilde, Emma and Edmund (Pius left for Gardner, Massachusetts, likely for work) returned to Ste Marie, as  Dieudonné #2, was born 17 May 1906 and baptized at Mont Carmel.  In 1911, they were living in Puellering, Kent, New Brunswick. Victoire was not identified in the 1921 census likely because there were large portions of the Moncton census, where the enumerator did not capture resident names (he just wrote “Westmoreland” next to each).  She was likely at 70 Pearl St., Moncton, the address that she, her husband and son Edmond all list as their home address when they immigrated to the United States the following year.

Victoire who was admitted to the US to visit her son Edmund on 9 Dec 1922 was described as 5’6″, 140 pounds, of medium complexion, brown hair and eyes. She claimed that she would be there less than 6 months and that it was her first visit.  Her husband joined her six months later, when he immigrated “permanently” to Gardner, Massachusetts from Moncton in May 1923.

Victorie

Docite and Victoire are listed in the 1924 Gardner, Massachusetts city directory on Parker Street (the same address as their son Edmond and Docite’s first cousin Calixte Roy).

Victoire’s young daughter Emma (wife of Frederick LeBlanc), age 32, died in Gardner in 1924, leaving five young children, Joseph, Ernest, Lauretta, Albert and Viola LeBlanc, all of whom were living on Parker Street, Gardner with their widowed father in 1930.

Thus, six of Victoire’s nine children predeceased her, leaving just three: Pius/Paul, Mathilde and Edmund.

It is unknown why/when Docite and Victoire returned to New Brunswick, however his death was recorded there on 16 Nov 1932 in St-Antoine, Ste Marie, Kent, New Brunswick.  According to his death certificate, he was buried at St-Antoine.

Victoire died a few years later, 25 Sep 1934, age 70, of vieillesse (old age), in the community of Mount Carmel, Ste Marie, Kent, New Brunswick and her death certificate indicates that she was buried there.  Victoire’s mother Madeleine died about 8 months later, 4 May 1935, age 92, 4 months in St Damien.  She was also buried in Mt Carmel cemetery in Ste Marie (neither of their graves have been located).

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